Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Understanding Greatness and Talent

What is known about giftedness and talent

  • Giftedness is identifiable in very young children.
  • Early identification is essential for the long-term wellbeing of the gifted child.
  • Giftedness is present equally in boys and girls and children from all socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.
  • Giftedness is not rare – it is estimated 10–15 per cent of the population is gifted.
  • Gifted children can also have learning difficulties and disabilities.
It is important that the term 'gifted and talented' is not used as a label. As with all children, every gifted and/or talented child is an individual, with a unique developmental and learning profile. To identify a child as gifted and/or talented is to recognize this individuality and respond appropriately.

See this link for more information.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Mobile Food Pantry Keeps Growing



Your Community Action Agency's mobile food pantry is helping even more people in its second month.

The pantry, done in collaboration with the Freestore Foodbank and Buckeye Health Plan, was such a big hit in July that additional food was donated this time. The initiative distributed enough food to help provide healthy meals for one week for between 200-250 families.

Led by Lamont Taylor, community engagement coordinator, the mobile food panty is held monthy at CAA headquarters in Bond Hill. Additionally, there are plans to expand the project to Avondale and Millvale.

The mobile food pantry is yet another way that CAA helps our friends and neighbors in need!


Friday, June 2, 2017

Current Head Start Job Openings

Current Job Postings

*To apply for Head Start positions, applicants must submit school transcripts and/or credentials with their resumes.

For more information, please contact CAA's Human Resources Department by email or by phone at 513.569.1840, ext.1016.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Cincinnati-Hamilton County Head Start Life Learning Center at CAA Awarded 5 Star Quality Rating



The Cincinnati-Hamilton County Head Start Life Learning Center at CAA has been awarded a 5 star quality rating by the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services quality rating and improvement system. The banner ceremony took place Monday, December 12th, as staff and supporters gathered to celebrate the award.
Congratulations Head Start!

Ted M. Berry Children & Family Learning Center Receives 5 Star Quality Rating


Congratulations to Theodore M. Berry Children & Family Learning Center they received a 5 star quality rating by the Ohio Department of Education and the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services quality rating and improvement system!

Dad's Head Start


Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Listening


Young children learn a great deal about the world around them through listening. They listen to different sounds and must rely on their listening skills for following directions at home and in school.

You can help your child become a better listener by encouraging your youngster to:

Play listening games such as “Simon Says” or “Red Rover.”
Listen to sounds, stories, riddles and rhymes.
Identify sounds made by animals and objects found in the home and outdoors.
Follow a sequence of three instructions. For example: “Put on your shorts, wash your hands, and         turn off the lights.”)
Repeat a nonsense sentence. (For example: “I saw a green cat driving a truck!”)
March to music.
Play musical instruments while listening to music

Thursday, May 28, 2015

The 8 “L’s” of Parenting

By Leah Davies, M.Ed.

1. LOVE your child. For your child to be successful, he or she must feel valued. Your gentle touches, smiles and hugs communicate love. Giving your undivided attention, especially at the end of each day, demonstrates caring.
  
2. LOOK for the good in your child and make specific comments on what he or she does well. You must believe in your child's worth before he or she can believe it. If you want your child to have self-confidence and motivation, watch for positive behaviors and comment on them.
  
3. LISTEN, without judgment, to your child express his or her thoughts and feelings. If you do not listen, your child may attempt to gain your attention by misbehaving.
  
4. LAUGH with your child, not at him or her. Demonstrate a sense of humor as you cope with life's difficulties. Laugh and play together.
  
5. LABOR diligently and with pride so that your child will want to work hard, persevere and do his or her best.
  
6. LEARN new information. It is fine to say, I don't know, but then add that you both can find out together. Take the time to read and thus instill a love of learning. On car trips play word games, read or listen to books on tape.
  
7. LEAVE the television and other media off. Many programs and video games desensitize your child towards violence and contribute to fearfulness and aggression. Place computers in central locations to monitor internet use.
  
8. LIVE life to its fullest. Take pleasure in little things like an ice cream cone, a beautiful day or the enthusiasm of your child. Read, pretend, dance, sing, take walks, play games, have pleasant meals, look at photos, share dreams, and enjoy each other. 

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Talking With Your Baby

Learning to talk is a process that starts at birth. A lot has happened in terms of your baby’s language development since he was born.  Around three months of age you’ve probably noticed that he really listens to your voice and is starting to make some of the sounds you make.  Most babies at this age have started making those delightful cooing and gurgling sounds we love to hear. One of the most wonderful things about being a parent is that you have the chance to help your baby’s language development simply by talking with him and naming the things around him. It’s that easy. You don’t need to buy fancy toys or the DVDs that are advertised to make your baby smart. Just talk, sing, and read with your baby throughout the day.

Babies learn best when they experience predictable routines. Use language to let your baby know what is coming next. For example, when you’re getting ready to change his diaper before a feeding say, “it’s time for a diaper change. Let’s go the changing table and get a clean diaper. Then it will be time to eat!” Even thought your baby does not have the ability to repeat these words back to you, he is beginning to understand what you are saying.

The more words your baby hears you say, the more words he will know. Talking with your baby is the easiest and best way to make your baby smart.

You can talk to your baby when you are busy doing other things (daily activities). Carry your baby in a sling or frontpack or put him on a blanket nearby while you:

* Bathe and get dressed    * Clean the bathroom
* Wash the dishes              * Fold the laundry
* Put away groceries          * Put on your makeup
* Shaving                            * Do your hair

Remember, it is important that he hear the words that go along with the routine. Before you know it he’ll be using words to describe his own actions!



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